Top Five Dating And Hookup Apps Fall 2016

Top Five Dating And Hookup Apps Fall 2016

Dating apps kind of suck — just ask anyone between the ages of 22 and 35. Despite this, they’ve become the normal way to meet people and ask them out. This puts you in a tough spot. Because everyone else is using dating apps, it’s tough to avoid using them, too. It’s a self-perpetuating cycle. To help  you navigate all the choices out there, we’ve picked seven of the most prevalent dating apps — or those that bring something unique to the table — along with our expert opinions on their accessibility, foibles, pratfalls, best intended uses, and everything else in between.

And we tried them. Each and every one.

While we can’t promise you won’t encounter an unwanted pornographic pic or a complete loser, we can at least tell you what you might be in for with each of these apps. That said, Good Luck!

#1 Peekya

http://www.Peekya.com  (watch the awesome video on the website)

Peekya is a newer app that boasts slightly more than 1 million users.  The nice thing about this app is it is free.  Tinder on Steroids so to speak with feature upgrades as well.  It allows you to search ahead in a place you will be and for activities you are interested in.  It also has all the same features of Tinder.  Swipe Left, Swipe Right, and message (for free) when you match.  This is completelyt supported by an ad at the bottom of a few pages and with the facebook login/account creation it is simple to use though a manual signup is there for those who hate facebook unlike Tinder..  Well worth checking out and number one on our list.  When will you be?

Android

http://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.app.peekya

Apple http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/peekya/id1122085766?mt=8

 

#2 Tinder

http://www.Tinder.com

First off, Tinder the app requires you to have a Facebook account in order to enable it, and you have to be over 18. Once enabled, you can set up a concise profile that consists of a 500-character bio and up to six images (we suggest always including a photo). You can also link your Tinder account to your Instagram, and include info about your employer and school. Discovery settings allow other users to find you, if desired, and set a few preferences regarding who you see. Then the real fun begins.

Tinder shows you a photo, name, and age. You can tap on the photo to see additional information regarding the person and Facebook friends you share (if any). You can also choose to swipe right (to like them), left (to pass), or up if you want use one of your precious “super likes” to show them you really really like them. If you and someone have both swiped right on one another, a screen will appear showing that you’ve matched and inviting you to send them a message. But most of the time, the Tinder experience will consist of flicking through profiles like channels on the television.

Tinder actually has one of the best user interfaces of any dating app around. The photos are large, the app is — comparatively speaking — svelte, and setting up your profile is pretty painless. Overall, Tinder gets an A for its usability. Also, no one can message you unless you have also expressed an interest in them, which means you get no unsolicited messages. While there are a fair few people on Tinder who use it strictly to collect swipes, many people are actually inclined to meet up in real life, which is not always the case with dating apps. Tinder is possibly the most popular dating app, too, meaning the likelihood of matching with someone you’re interested in who doesn’t live super far away is greater than with apps that have fewer users.

The downside to Tinder is the pricing for features.  It also charges older users more.  Either 9.99 or 19.99 depending on age.  Thus the #2 ranking

Android

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tinder&hl=en

Apple

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/tinder/id547702041?mt=8&uo=6&at=1l3vqFK&ct=website

 

#3  OKCupid

http://OKCupid.com

Another dating app that piggybacks on Facebook. Once you’ve set up your profile and input your preferences, it will send you one “bagel” a day, which is essentially the profile of a potential match. You then have 24 hours to decide whether you want to “like” or “pass” on your bagel. If you like your bagel and they have also liked you, you’ll connect, meaning that you’ll be able to message one another in a private chat. That chat room expires after eight days, regardless of whether you’ve talked with your bagel or not. You can also earn “beans” that allow for extra app functions, either by purchasing them outright or recommending the app to your friends.

Props to Coffee Meets Bagel for having the cutest name of all the dating apps. The service also offers more specific preference options, meaning you can narrow your choices to certain religious beliefs or ethnicities, if those things are important to you. You can load up to nine photos and have a much more prolific profile, too, and if you’ve entered any ice breakers into your profile, the app will send one of them to a bagel you’ve connected with as the first message for greater convenience. The fact that the chat room expires after a week puts some pressure on you to exchange phone numbers or meet up in real life, or to just quietly fade away without any fuss. The interface is also relatively user-friendly, with large photos and clean text.

Appearances can be deceiving, though. Although Coffee Meets Bagel allows for a range of super specific preferences, the bagel it sends you may or may not match your specified preferences and, more often than not, if they do, they will be a significant distance away. The app can also be glitchy, often resulting in slow update and load times, and sometimes it’s frustrating that it sends you only a single bagel a day. You can speed things up a bit by using the “give & take” option, but it’ll cost you 385 beans to like someone who catches your eye.

The slow pace and infrequency of actually connecting with someone makes it all too easy to be super passive in the app, which can render it useless. In addition, once you like or pass someone, Coffee Meets Bagel asks you to specify your reasons for doing so, making you feel judgmental and kind of like a jerk if your answer is “unattractive.” The answers are only sent to the developers, who supposedly use the information to help better curate your resulting bagels. Still. Weird.

Andriod

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.okcupid.okcupid

Apple

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/okcupid-dating/id338701294?mt=8

#4

Hinge is kind of like Tinder. Okay, it’s actually a lot like Tinder, but with a few key differences that make it superior. Interface-wise, it looks like Tinder’s younger sister. However, function-wise, it relies more on your Facebook friends to make connections for you. Hinge also connects you through friends of friends of friends, and shows you not just the people you have in common, but also all the things you have in common. It does this by having you answer a bunch of questions through a Tinder-like interface. Have you been to Berlin? Swipe right. Don’t play croquet? Swipe left. This makes answering questions far easier and less time consuming, not to mention more fun. The questions themselves aren’t as asinine as those in some other dating apps — ahem, Score — and give you a better sense of someone than 500 characters might.

If you want to know more about someone, you can always just ask the friend you have in common, which is a nice human touch that’s absent from most dating apps. Moreover, people can message you only if you’ve matched, so no unsolicited “greetings” from someone you would never match with. You can see what sort of relationship people are looking for, and while that doesn’t sound that revolutionary, it reflects the fact that Hinge carries more of a dating expectation than a just-hooking-up expectation à la Tinder. Furthermore, because of the friends-of-friends connection, you’re less likely to run across inappropriate photos. That’s a plus in our book.

You can only add photos of yourself from Facebook or Instagram, though, which is kind of limiting if you’re not very active on either. Also, while the friends-of-friends concept has a lot of benefits, it’s also restricting. It’s possible to run out of matches after 10 minutes of browsing, which is a let down if you’re actually enjoying the app or are serious about finding a date.

Downside again is the .99 to boost your profile for a whopping 15 minutes
#5 Match  http://www.Match.com

Match.com was at the top of the dating game long before the service ever released an official mobile app. Thankfully, you don’t have to log into the app via Facebook, though you will have to go through a sign-up process that requires you to add a few photos, answer some questions about your gender and preferences, and create a username and password. The same login credentials will work with the desktop version of the site.

The Match.com iteration of flirting is sending someone a “wink,” and you can search through the Match.com database to find people to wink at. The service will also provide you with personalized matches on a daily basis, which take your interests into consideration. To really make the most of Match.com, however, you’re going to need a subscription, which can get a little pricey — the cheapest option currently available will run you $21 a month for six months. A premium subscription does allow you to see who’s recently looked at your profile and who has liked your pictures, though, and includes a host of other features.

The Match.com interface is also pretty sleek and minimalist, but it’s not as easy to use as, say, Tinder. It utilizes a set of tabs that run along the top of the display — i.e. “matches,” “search,” “viewed me,” and “mixer” — which break up the service’s various functions. It’s not an overly complicated app, but it does take a few minutes to get used to.

 

Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.match.android.matchmobile&hl=en

Apple https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/match-dating-app-to-flirt/id305939712?mt=8